https://ethnobioconservation.com/index.php/ebc/issue/feed Ethnobiology and Conservation 2022-01-07T18:12:39+00:00 Rômulo Romeu da Nóbrega Alves romulo_nobrega@yahoo.com.br Open Journal Systems https://ethnobioconservation.com/index.php/ebc/article/view/533 Is timber management a realistic conservation alternative for indigenous Amazonian communities? 2021-10-26T16:44:57+00:00 Lucia Alejandra Fitts fitts010@umn.edu Zoila Aurora Cruz-Burga zcruz@lamolina.edu.pe Hannah Legatzke legat031@umn.edu María de los Ángeles La Torre-Cuadros mlatorrec@cientifica.edu.pe <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Indigenous people, who are often economically, socially, and culturally dependent on forests, represent important stakeholders in forest management. Due to high costs, indigenous communities partner with external institutions to harvest timber, often resulting in forest degradation within their territories, internal and external conflicts, and disinterest in starting new timber management projects. Using a standardized methodology to investigate the outcomes of previous community forestry projects presents an opportunity to better understand and potentially resolve further issues. To investigate this issue, we conducted research in the Sinchi Roca I native community in Peru. Our objectives were: (1) to describe the process of timber harvest; (2) to analyze gender differences in local perception of timber management; and (3) to evaluate the outcomes of the timber activity, applying socioeconomic criteria and indicators. Data collection included in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, and intra-household surveys. We found that locals partnered with a company for timber harvesting, which led to a sanction from the Peruvian government. Timber harvesting was negatively perceived in the community, with 83.75% of survey respondents dissatisfied with the activity and 88.75% reporting internal and external conflicts due to the presence of the company. Moreover, women did not have a major role in timber harvesting, nor did they actively participate in planning meetings. Results suggest that improving future timber management projects in indigenous communities requires that projects be adapted to local realities and encourage local participation, including training for locals in governance, administration of documents, and negotiations with external stakeholders.</span></p> 2022-01-07T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Ethnobiology and Conservation https://ethnobioconservation.com/index.php/ebc/article/view/573 Human perception towards the association between the domestic rock pigeon and the insect vector of Chagas disease in an urban area of Argentina 2021-09-06T14:32:36+00:00 Viviana Noemí Fernández-Maldonado vivifernandezm@unsj-cuim.edu.ar Carlos E. Borghi cborghi@unsj-cuim.edu.ar <p>This article focuses on identifying risk factors through the knowledge, perceptions, and prevention practices of the population regarding the rock pigeon and the vector of Chagas disease (vinchucas) in an urban area of Argentina. The study used interviews of focal groups, family nuclei with nearby nesting sites and without nearby nesting sites. Among the results, some risk factors that contribute to the infestation of vinchucas in houses were identified, such as presence of nesting sites of the rock pigeon, and frequency of cleaning the nests and of fumigation. We show that people that kept their houses clean of nests and routinely disinfected their homes had considerably lower probability of finding vinchucas within their houses. We also identify a general lack of knowledge about risk factors of Chagas disease related to the presence of nesting sites in houses, the form of dispersion of the vector and how to act upon encountering a vinchuca. However, respondents who presented nests in their houses associated the encounter of vinchucas with the presence of nesting sites. The respondents showed high levels of support for programs to control the population of the rock pigeon. It is important that the population at risk of contracting Chagas disease can combat this disease through their daily actions. Promoting better knowledge of risk factors would be an important advancement for community compliance and participation in the fight against Chagas disease.</p> 2022-01-17T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Ethnobiology and Conservation